Salty Sun Tales
Salty Sun Tales
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tarafirmatravels:

blue hues pt. II / antelope valley, california
tarafirmatravels:

blue hues pt. II / antelope valley, california
tarafirmatravels:

blue hues pt. II / antelope valley, california
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elisemesner:

 Illustration from “Who Will Comfort Toffle?” by Tove Jansson, 1960
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catrinastewart said: “The Jantar Mantar is a collection of astronomical instruments, built by king Sawai Jai Singh in Jaipur, India between 1727-1734.”
 “The observatory consists of fourteen major geometric devices for measuring time, predicting eclipses, tracking stars’ location as the earth orbits around the sun, ascertaining the declinations of planets, and determining the celestial altitudes and related ephemerides. Each is a fixed and ‘focused’ tool. The Samrat Yantra, the largest instrument, is 90 feet (27 m) high, its shadow carefully plotted to tell the time of day. Its face is angled at 27 degrees, the latitude of Jaipur. The Hindu chhatri (small cupola) on top is used as a platform for announcing eclipses and the arrival of monsoons.” Wikipedia

catrinastewart said: “The Jantar Mantar is a collection of astronomical instruments, built by king Sawai Jai Singh in Jaipur, India between 1727-1734.”
 “The observatory consists of fourteen major geometric devices for measuring time, predicting eclipses, tracking stars’ location as the earth orbits around the sun, ascertaining the declinations of planets, and determining the celestial altitudes and related ephemerides. Each is a fixed and ‘focused’ tool. The Samrat Yantra, the largest instrument, is 90 feet (27 m) high, its shadow carefully plotted to tell the time of day. Its face is angled at 27 degrees, the latitude of Jaipur. The Hindu chhatri (small cupola) on top is used as a platform for announcing eclipses and the arrival of monsoons.” Wikipedia

catrinastewart said: “The Jantar Mantar is a collection of astronomical instruments, built by king Sawai Jai Singh in Jaipur, India between 1727-1734.”
 “The observatory consists of fourteen major geometric devices for measuring time, predicting eclipses, tracking stars’ location as the earth orbits around the sun, ascertaining the declinations of planets, and determining the celestial altitudes and related ephemerides. Each is a fixed and ‘focused’ tool. The Samrat Yantra, the largest instrument, is 90 feet (27 m) high, its shadow carefully plotted to tell the time of day. Its face is angled at 27 degrees, the latitude of Jaipur. The Hindu chhatri (small cupola) on top is used as a platform for announcing eclipses and the arrival of monsoons.” Wikipedia
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Black Circle, 1915.- Kazimir Malevich.